Signs of Elder Abuse

Signs of Elder Abuse

Elder abuse is a subject that needs more discussion. Elder abuse comes in different forms and usually goes unreported the National Council on Aging says that 1 in 10 of Americans over age 65 are abused in some form and only 1 in 14 cases of elder abuse are reported to the authorities. Elder abuse has signs that get overlooked all the time.

How to make decisions for my mother with dementia?

A book to help with decision making for your loved ones with dementia

This book is a good to consider the decision-making process for a loved one that needs someone to speak for them. The Author is a bioethicist named Viki Kind, MA. This book is very easy to read and has stories from the authors personal life and from different situations she was involved with. If you have a loved one that is mentally disabled or has become impaired from an injury or disease, this a great resource to help you respect the wishes and best interests of those you love. The author has some different charts for the reader to use. Some of the charts are 5 Core questions flowchart and the decisions making sliding scale. The author also has examples talking about issues that came up with her father that had dementia and explains the sliding scale of decision making. The part of the book that I learned the most from was the part about hospice and decisions with death and dying. When your loved one comes to the end it is hard to make any kind of decision. The author uses the example of waiting to make decisions with her mother and how she should have used hospice earlier. This book gives you some very good tips and insights into what the best course of action should be depending on your loved one and their wishes. This book also goes through the advance directive questions and guides you through the decision process. This is a great book to read when you are considering advance directives for your loved one. The Caregivers Path to Compassionate Decision Making is worth the time especially if you must make decisions for any of your loved ones. This book is a good read for caregivers and for medical professionals to get a more empathetic view into the decision-making process.